Browsing: VIEWdigital news

By Brian Pelan, VIEW editor Amidst the grandeur of the Harbour Office in Belfast, Julia Unwin, chief executive of the Joseph Rowntree Foundation, gave a social justice lecture last night (Monday, October 19) about combating poverty. The event was organised by the Law Centre (NI). Ms Unwin delivered a polished performance in which she touched upon many of the key factors surrounding poverty in the UK and the need to change it. Shortly after her talk ended, I posed some questions to her around the issue of poverty and why is it still with us in the 21st century?. “I think…

VIEWdigital co-founder Una Murphy, left, who spoke at a workshop at yesterday’s Digital DNA conference in Titanic, Belfast, with Stephen Gray from NICVA and head of digital content at MacMillian Cancer, Amanda Neylon. The workshop, aimed at the third sector, explored the various digital technologies which have proven a track record in assisting organisations in the community/voluntary/charity sector to become more efficient, responsive and effective in achieving their objectives.

Third sector organisations are still leading the way when it comes to best-practice leadership and service provision, according to the head of the umbrella group for voluntary, community and social enterprise chiefs in Northern Ireland. Speaking at the launch of the CO3 leadership awards – Celebrating Champions 2016 – Nora Smith, Chief Executive of CO3, said that third sector leaders are at the forefront of delivering vital services and providing a voice for those in most need. Ms Smith said: “This is despite ongoing financial pressures including reduced overall funding and delayed processing of existing funding. In an era of austerity, more is expected from…

How can charities, community groups and other not for profit organisations best embrace and harness the full potential benefits that digital platforms, tools and content offer? We asked digital communications specialist Harry Reid to share his 10 top tips 1,  Become informed – The core of ‘the digital thing’ is developing a sensibility about what each of the range of digital tools, when well deployed, can achieve. Make informed choices about which combination best serves your organisation’s aims. 2,  Operate strategically – Consider which digital channels you have the resources, particularly in staff or volunteers’ time, to exploit well. Don’t,…

By Sophie Mullen A founder partner of Go ON UK – the UK’s Digital Skills Alliance – Lloyds Bank UK has spelt out the ‘state of digital’ in Northern Ireland but it’s latest Business Digital Index makes grim reading. While Northern Ireland in many respects is becoming a leader in its own right in the digital sector, with technology giants making their home here, sadly the opposite seems to be true, according to this year’s Digital Skills Index, looking at SMEs and charities across the UK. It would be easy to mistake Northern Ireland as a digitally skilled nation. Belfast…

With innovation charity Nesta predicting that crowdfunding could be worth £4.7 billion to UK charities in 2016 and statutory funding stalling or being cut, digital communications consultant Harry Reid examines if it can be a potential lifesaving part of a voluntary organisation’s funding efforts Indiegogo sounded to me like a really bad Eurovision act the first time I came across the moniker about five years ago. Yet rather than a nul points scoring group of Norwegian would-be hipsters, checking it out online I discovered it was something called a crowdfunding platform that had been launched in 2008. Back…

By Barry Adams, Guest editor for VIEW’s Community Goes Digital issue Digital has become the buzzword of this decade. Everything has to be digital, and we all have to become digitally empowered citizens. Few people ever stop to think about what all this digital malarkey actually means. We’re so caught up in the hype surrounding digital technologies, we can’t see the wood from the trees. This is especially true in the community and voluntary sector. “We have to go digital!” some poor board member proclaims, having read an alarmist article in a publication about how lagging behind in digital is…

The BBC Audience Council is seeking the views of the public, including the community and voluntary sector,  on BBC programmes and services at an informal discussion event on Friday, September 11 (12.30 to 2pm)  at the Glenavon House Hotel, Cookstown. A spokesperson for the Council said it has a particular interest in views about BBC Radio Ulster/Foyle and BBC local news and current affairs services, to help inform a BBC Trust review that aims to assess how well these services are performing for their audiences and how they might develop in the future. This is also an important time for the BBC…

The second year of the Live Here Love Here Small Grants Scheme will help communities, schools and groups to take practical action to improve their local environment and support the growth of civic pride throughout Northern Ireland. The environmental charity, Keep Northern Ireland Beautiful will be working with the Department of the Environment, Tourism Northern Ireland and local Councils to launch the Live Here Love Here Small Grants Scheme, which is designed to tackle issues such as poor environmental quality, littering and dilapidation by encouraging volunteers to take practical action in their local communities. Interested groups can visit www.liveherelovehere.org for…

The average kilometre of beach in Northern Ireland has more than 5,000 pieces of litter on it. This stark assessment has been issued by environmental charity Keep Northern Ireland Beautiful, following a three-year survey. The charity has been counting the litter on beaches from Lough Foyle to Carlingford Lough for the past three years, and the 2015 results are the worst yet. On the 14 reference beaches, an average of 1,500 bits of plastic, 425 plastic drinks bottles and 180 cotton buds per kilometre were observed. At least 80 percent of the litter was made of plastic and likely to…

By Steven Agnew, MLA and leader of the Green Party in Northern Ireland On election as an MLA, I became acutely aware that there was wide criticism from within the children’s sector of the failure of government to deliver on outcomes outlined in the OFMDFM Ten Year Strategy for Children and Young People. All children should receive the services they need to reach their full potential. We must ensure that their basic needs are met and their rights protected. To put it in context, Northern Ireland has some of the highest levels of child poverty in the UK, with 21 percent…

By Claire Savage As a former Department of Work and Pensions employee who previously toured Iraq, Colette Ansell has experienced both sides of the poverty divide. The young single mother, who lives in Portstewart with her four-year-old son Kurtis, is now firmly on the road to financial recovery however, thanks to some timely community support. A report from Save the Children in 2014 claimed that by 2020, almost one-in-four children will be living in poverty in Northern Ireland. Colette’s story shows how easily this can happen. She is upfront about her financial situation, which rapidly worsened after she left the…

By Marion Mcleod is Policy Manager for Children in Scotland Children in the poorest families are far more likely to suffer adversity in childhood than their better-off counterparts. We also know that the effects of this early adversity are profound and enduring. The poorest children are many times more likely than those in the richest to have fallen measurably behind in their cognitive development by the age of two. On their journey to adulthood, our poorest children are far more likely to experience instability in their families, insecurity in housing, bereavement and poor educational attainment; in adult life they are…

By Jane Craven, founder and chairperson of the Whiterock Children’s Centre, Belfast Whiterock is number one on the indices of multiple deprivations, we have a post-conflict legacy leading to many physical and mental health issues, we have traditional inter-generational unemployment. All and any of the other short-term projects, inadequately measured, have not addressed these major issues. I say give us a chance. Child poverty will not disappear without a significant change in axis. Has any part of Government the courage to really tackle this? Has any part of Government the courage to use those community activists and providers, those on…

By Kerry Melville, Coordinator, Belfast Food Network Nearly 9000 people have received food parcels from independent and Trussel Trust food banks over the past two years in Belfast, as they could not afford to feed themselves or their families. This is a serious issue that has been rapidly increasing over the past decade, yet there is little political recognition of the problem. Many households have difficulty in accessing an adequate diet, with parents increasingly skipping meals in order to feed their children. The Belfast Food Network recently commissioned the ‘Enough is Enough’ scoping survey to find out the scale of…

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